Weekly Big Data Catch-Up

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Dataconomy » Weekly Newsletter

News, Events and Opinions from the world of Big Data.

Excerpts:

How Big Data Brought Ford Back from the Brink

Ford Big Data Featured ImageIn 1913, the Ford Motor Company was at the forefront of car manufacture. Designing the reasonably-priced Model T to appeal to the masses and employing division of labour & moblised assembly lines in the factory made Ford the largest automobile factory in the world at that time. In 2007, the Ford Motor Company was in trouble. The end of 2006 financial year brought with it reports of a $12.6 billion dollar loss, the largest in the company’s history. Yet, once again, forward-thinking innovation- this time, in the form of data analytics- led Ford back to the path of prosperity. By 2009, Ford was posting profits for the first time in 4 years, as well as launching 25 new vehicle lines. The same year they sold 2.3 million cars, the only…

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Democratizing Data Assets: Learning From Data, Big and Small

7772710246_f660f56153_zWhen we devote so much time and energy talking about Big Data, are we neglecting the important things that you can do with Small Data? Maybe, but… probably not. Looking beyond the Big Data hype helps us to capture real value from advanced analytics on data, big and small. The drumbeat of Big Data dialogue in social media, in the press, and everywhere merely highlights the important roles that data and analytics are now playing in all sectors. While we read, think, and dream about Big Data, we also realize that the “big” in Big Data refers to more than just data volume. We know all about Big Data velocity, variety, value, and more. For example: independent of data volume, you can have lots of variety in your data, you can have…

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Birst Introduces A Free Analytics Tool for NetSuite Customers

birst-articleBirst, the business intelligence and cloud analytics platform provider, announced yesterday that it would be offering a free analytics tool for NetSuite customers. The deal between the two companies is aimed at improving user experience in NetSuite and also increasing the standards inside “enterprise resource planning and customer relationship management software.” “By embedding Birst’s business intelligence platform within NetSuite’s software suite, we can help NetSuite customers optimize business processes, ultimately driving better performance throughout the organization,” said Birst Chief Product Officer Brad Peters. NetSuite’s 20,000 financial and ERP customers will have access to Birst Express for free by clicking on a tab within NetSuite. Users will then have access to the pre-built dashboard, KPIs and reports to “analyze bookings and billings data across products, geographies and customer types” as well…

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Big Data Complexity and India’s Election

6886404209_1f745ab7ba_zThe 2014 parliamentary elections in India witnessed two trends this year: a huge increase in new voters and massive advances in technology. In a recent news report, we uncovered the way in which analysts were using data from a range of sources – Facebook likes, tweets, calling behaviour, SMS’s – to help politicians better understand the electorate and where they should target their efforts. In line with this, a data analytics startup called Modak Analytics recently announced that it has built India’s first Electoral Data Repository. The project involved different data from 814 million voters, proving to be the largest of its kind on the planet. In comparison, the USA has 193.6 million voters, Indonesia 171 million, and the UK 45.5 million. The complexities included: - 543 Parliamentary and 4120 assembly…

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Netflix Creating TV Shows with Big Data

Netflix creates House of Cards with Big DataIn 2012, Americans watched more legally-delivered video content via the Internet than on physical formats such as DVDs. This shift in format also allows online content providers to gather large amounts of data on viewer habits. Recommendation engine Netflix is the de facto iTunes for online video content. It collects data on every search and every rating entered into the system. Netflix user logins allows further data enrichment with verified personal information (sex, age, location), as well as preferences (viewing history, bookmarks, Facebook likes). Third-party data providers, such as Nielsen, adds an extra layer of data on top. In the same way Amazon crunches all that data to make book recommendations, Netflix makes movie recommendations. The better recommendation engine, the more content gets watched. Having details on when and where…

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Big Data: Brazil and Mexico Leading The Way In Latin America

11987438845_e2c216cd86_zIn a recent study by IDC, Brazil and Mexico are said to be the biggest markets for sales of big data solutions. The study predicts that both countries will drive growth in Latin America through to 2016. Analysts at IDC estimate that revenue generated from big data – hardware, software and services – will grow from US$551 million in 2013 to US$6.59 billion by 2018, a compound annual growth rate of 64% for 2013-2018. Furthermore, the study estimates that 40 percent of Latin American firms make “moderate or high usage of analysis over structured and unstructured data sources,” although it was noted that the majority of this percentage is attributed to Brazil and Mexico. By 2017, however, Latin America will see a shift in growth rate; IDC expects Chile, Peru…

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‘The Right to be Forgotten’: Google Defeated in EU Privacy Case

Google Defeated in EU Court Over Right to be ForgottenGoogle suffered a disruptive defeat yesterday, when Europe’s top court ruled search engines should erase links to ‘outdated’ or ‘irrelevant’ information on individuals upon their request. The case was brought forward by Mario Costeja González, a Spanish national who complained to Google after searches of his name brought up an article from 1998, stating his property was to be be auctioned to pay off outstanding welfare debts. The ruling espouses the so-called ‘Right to be Forgotten’, and represents a shift in the balance between personal privacy and freedom of speech on the internet. The EU Justice Commissioner, Viviane Reding, described the victory as a “clear victory for the protection of personal data of Europeans”. “The ruling confirms the need to bring today’s data protection rules from the “digital stone age”…

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“Big Data” Set To Die In The Near Future

4181746204_5813343639_zThe term “big data” has been prevalent over the past few years. Yet, according to Donald Feinberg, VP of Gartner’s Business Intelligence and Information Management group, the term will “disappear” in the near future. Talking at Gartner’s Business Intelligence and Information Management summit in São Paulo, Feinberg said “The term ‘big data’ is going to disappear in the next two years, to become just ‘data’ or ‘any data.’ But, of course, the analysis of data will continue.” Analysts and commentators have argued that the hype around “big data” has led to confusion about the term and its application for business. While Gartner reported that 64 percent of organizations are planning to invest in big data (up by 6 percent compared to 2012), the study also noted two interesting statistics that support Feinberg’s…

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Splice Machine Goes Public With Its Hadoop RDBMS

splice-machineSplice Machine, a company that provides a Hadoop relational database management system (RDBMS), announced yesterday that it would be moving its management system from private beta to public beta.  The company will be offering its database to download for free and it is a fully supported commercial product. “Our go-to-market strategy is a freemium model,” said Monte Zweben, the CEO and cofounder of Splice. “Anyone can develop on Splice Machine and essentially do so for free, and when they put it into operation and derive value out of it, then they would license the platform on a per node basis, very similar to the Hadoop pricing schemes from the Hadoop distribution companies.” Splice’s software is designed to help organizations overcome Hadoop’s batch analysis limitations by using their transactional SQL database…

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